The Ball is in the Net. Goal or No Goal?

goal

The ball hit the net but from which side. Can you tell? Over the past three years, companies have pushed themselves to the cloud for many reasons but have they landed in the wrong side of the net?

Many companies have mistaken moving to the cloud for a goal to be achieved and it is natural to make that mistake. Companies see the bottom line, that building services in PAAS or IAAS clouds lowers the costs of bootstrapping risky projects, speeds up time to market and enables greater flexibility. They naturally make moving everything to the cloud a business target.

They miss that driving these benefits are the ways that automation and infrastructure as a service force the modernization and industrialization of a company’s IT teams and processes. Even if a company isn’t using any modern software driven deployment techniques, it is the industrialization of infrastructure on the provider’s side that allows a “machine” to be spec’ed, purchased, racked, cabled, and installed at the push of a button or the call of an API. It is this change in the way that IT works that is improving the bottom line, speeding time to market and increasing the business agility.

Companies that make this distinction realize that hosting your servers in a cloud, private or public, isn’t an end, in and of itself. If it’s the automation and software defined infrastructure that is helping business, then that has to be the focus.

In reality, IAAS is still very immature. There is no provider today that can provide public IAAS which meets the standards of a high quality private deployment, let alone enterprise grade.

Visionary companies like Netflix have built vast frameworks to compensate for some of the problems with public cloud. In 2013, Netflix’s director of cloud solutions Ariel Tseitlin is quoted as having said “We’re far from being in a commoditized cloud market. It really isn’t a utility like we feel someday it is going to become. If you look at how much infrastructure we built, the huge amount of extra glue and services and tooling we’ve invested in, that gives you an indication of what could be offered in the future.”

Others, like Zynga, went the hybrid cloud route because “While the public cloud is exceptional at providing a wealth of services for various computing needs, we’re an outlier and not a traditional IT workload. The performance and availability required to operate social games on the scale that we do, requires the ability to fine tune infrastructure… We learned to understand our workload, look into the black box of cloud computing, and built what we affectionately call zCloud, our own private cloud infrastructure. zCloud looks, feels, and operates similar to the way we use the public cloud, but allows for greater performance, scale and reliability.”

Between these two notorious cloud consumers, the common denominator is the drive to change the way infrastructure is consumed by the business without sacrificing the quality or reliability of the services. That is why companies should be striving to modernize mainstream IT whether on private, public, or hybrid infrastructure.

Note: Jason Hoffman, Founder and former CTO of Joyent, now Head of Cloud Technology at Ericsson, really put this into perspective to me with this video segment (from which I definitely cannibalized some jargon). After living and breathing “cloud” for the past three years, I think he’s really hit the nail on the head and it will be interesting to see what Ericsson can do to bring forth the next iteration of IAAS.

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